Underlore

I have an Adri, your argument is invalid.

Things every kid should know.

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“The foundation of every state is the education of its youth.” – Diogenes

1. No one decides to be mean.
2. Being older doesn’t mean being smarter.
3. Respect does not mean obedience.
4. If someone can tell you what to do with something it’s theirs.
5. Responsibility is usually code for control.
6. Those who have more force others to have less.
7. Angry people are afraid of something.
8. If someone forces you instead of explains, you’re smarter than they are.
9. People want you to compete because they are afraid of what you can do when you cooperate.
10. Everyone gets something out of what they are doing.
11. No one chooses how smart they are.
12. No one chooses how they feel.
13. Almost everything is a matter of opinion.
14. Smart people can be wrong.
15. The message is independent of the messenger.
16. The majority can be wrong.
17. Reality is not a democracy.
18. Academic skill does not equal intelligence.
19. There is a tool or trick to offset every weakness.
20. Those that tell you loudest to work hard often aren’t working at all.
21. You don’t have to be part of something to understand something.
22. You could be the first.
23. Hurting people doesn’t make you strong or right.
24. Removing the need for something is the best way to fight it.
25. Everything you own charges you rent.
26. Only you know your gender.
27. Laziness is not a bad thing.
28. There are always more options.
29. How you feel and think depend partly on your health.
30. Your body is your brain’s pet.
31. You have a limited amount of time, spend it wisely sell it rarely.
32. People lie because the truth is a threat to them.
33. No one can tell you what love means.
34. Revenge is an attempt to control the past.
35. Context changes meaning, and you can always add context.
36. Outliving something is better than killing it.
37. They care enough to tell you they don’t care.
38. If they tell you they’re laughing, chances are, they aren’t.
39. The truth doesn’t always look true.
40. Knowing you could be wrong does not mean you are.
41. You don’t have to be an expert to be right.
42. No one owns a fact.
43. You don’t have to earn the right to live.
44. Wealth is about luck and ethics.
45. People who want power shouldn’t get it.
46. Genius is always outnumbered.
47. Strangers are more complicated than you think.
48. Everyone has a reason.
49. Some people are immune to the truth, sometimes it’s you.
50. There will always be things you don’t know about yourself.
51. Not all things are scalable.
52. Ignorance is not the same as stupidity.
53. Maturity does not equal conformity.
54. The really good ideas aren’t always popular.
55. Writing is nearly immortal and often ignored.
56. You are always entitled to an explanation that ignores authority.
57. You do not have to be what your parents intended.
58. Truly nice people are rarely popular, they tend to hide.
59. You’re a completely different person after a while.
60. Poor people exist mainly because rich people sequester wealth.
61. It’s not holding a grudge if they continuously offend you.
62. You will outlive all the adults, that means the future is your business.
63. If they can’t tell you what’s in it for them, it’s a trap.
64. Evolution doesn’t always improve things.
65. Common sense isn’t rare, you’re just misunderstanding the actual agenda of the parties involved.
##. There are always more things to put on this list.

189 Comments

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  1. Fantastic, should be where every child who is able to read, can see it.

  2. Fantastic, should be where every child who is able to read, can see it.

  3. I know it would have helped me. Thanks for your comment.

  4. I know it would have helped me. Thanks for your comment.

  5. To the printers!

  6. To the printers!

  7. Wow. Just wow. Some of these are so simple-sounding…but make you think. I had to chuckle at #58; so THAT’S why it’s so hard to find a nice person! Well done :)

  8. Wow. Just wow. Some of these are so simple-sounding…but make you think. I had to chuckle at #58; so THAT’S why it’s so hard to find a nice person! Well done :)

  9. Nice list, although I disagree with numbers one and twelve. Very much so, in fact. Many people choose to be mean. They’re called sadists. And although most emotions are involuntary, you can, in fact, decide how you want to feel in many cases. It’s just that it’s so much easier to simply let feelings happen, instead of to try to engender, control, or discard them.

  10. Nice list, although I disagree with numbers one and twelve. Very much so, in fact. Many people choose to be mean. They’re called sadists. And although most emotions are involuntary, you can, in fact, decide how you want to feel in many cases. It’s just that it’s so much easier to simply let feelings happen, instead of to try to engender, control, or discard them.

  11. @Kris
    Thank you very much :)

  12. @Kris
    Thank you very much :)

  13. @Dr. Awkwad

    You are not thinking far enough back. Sure looked at like that people choose to be mean, but look at WHY they choose to be mean. They do it because being mean feels good to them. They did not choose that. No one choose what feels good to them else we’d all have a masturbation fetish and our favorite food would be oatmeal.

    You can try to hack your own brain, indoctrinate and brainwash yourself but as any phobic will tell you, whether it works or not is chance. Even the most concentrated efforts sometimes fail.

    For example, how about you make yourself agree with 1 and 12 :)

    You can’t because you just don’t. Emotions are the same way, they underlie logic. Sometimes logic can reach down in bio feedback kind of way and influence emotions, but that’s not actual control.

    Not until we can literally change our brain paths directly, surgically (there is no correct word yet since I don’t mean cutting open the skull), will the concept of our emotions being under our control have any real meaning.

    Because think about it, your emotional state has to motivate you to want to change your emotions before you can even start. Some people don’t want to change, and that was not a choice.

    The cult of personal responsibility stems from ignorance and is there largely to justify servitude in my opinion. Boils down to the free will debate.

  14. @Dr. Awkwad

    You are not thinking far enough back. Sure looked at like that people choose to be mean, but look at WHY they choose to be mean. They do it because being mean feels good to them. They did not choose that. No one choose what feels good to them else we’d all have a masturbation fetish and our favorite food would be oatmeal.

    You can try to hack your own brain, indoctrinate and brainwash yourself but as any phobic will tell you, whether it works or not is chance. Even the most concentrated efforts sometimes fail.

    For example, how about you make yourself agree with 1 and 12 :)

    You can’t because you just don’t. Emotions are the same way, they underlie logic. Sometimes logic can reach down in bio feedback kind of way and influence emotions, but that’s not actual control.

    Not until we can literally change our brain paths directly, surgically (there is no correct word yet since I don’t mean cutting open the skull), will the concept of our emotions being under our control have any real meaning.

    Because think about it, your emotional state has to motivate you to want to change your emotions before you can even start. Some people don’t want to change, and that was not a choice.

    The cult of personal responsibility stems from ignorance and is there largely to justify servitude in my opinion. Boils down to the free will debate.

  15. #12 is so backward and wrong…Obviously written by a ‘feeler’ rather than a ‘thinker’. Cognitive psychology disagrees with you to the n-th degree. So does any modern understanding of how the brain works. Thoughts engender emotional responses–as opposed to feeling responses which are physical, hot, cold, tired, etc.–which lead to behavioral actions. You control your thoughts, you control your emotions. Simple.

    Of course, this does require you to make a distinction between emotions and feelings. I was assuming you used feelings to also mean emotions as indicated by your subsequent comments.

    A lot of these things on the list sound nice–a very Disney view of things–but can easily be proven wrong. For instance, I’ve decided to be mean on purpose. I had no goal other than the act of meanness itself. You can claim I’m not ‘looking deep enough’ but you are begging the question then and simply appealing to some ‘invisible’ third party to save you. The principle of charity dictates that you have to take people at their word otherwise we cannot even have discussions. My word is that I’ve done this. The simple truth is, I have. Meh.

    As to the free will debate…there is no debate. You are predetermined. Philosophy has largely moved past this as a relevant subject because the overwhelming mountain of evidence lands in favor of causal determinism. Of course this also rules out most spirituality as a side effect which a lot of people don’t like, but there you have it. Free will is kept–in my experience–as a trinket to show 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate students. No one seriously defends this anymore. It’s just ludicrous with science at the level it’s at.

    All in all, this list seems directed at those who you either think know more than you or who tell you they know more than you. There is a distinct bias against the hard-sciences which is slightly disturbing since every modern convenience we have is directely attributable to the hard sciences.

    Anyway, nice list at least in part

    Cheers!

  16. #12 is so backward and wrong…Obviously written by a ‘feeler’ rather than a ‘thinker’. Cognitive psychology disagrees with you to the n-th degree. So does any modern understanding of how the brain works. Thoughts engender emotional responses–as opposed to feeling responses which are physical, hot, cold, tired, etc.–which lead to behavioral actions. You control your thoughts, you control your emotions. Simple.

    Of course, this does require you to make a distinction between emotions and feelings. I was assuming you used feelings to also mean emotions as indicated by your subsequent comments.

    A lot of these things on the list sound nice–a very Disney view of things–but can easily be proven wrong. For instance, I’ve decided to be mean on purpose. I had no goal other than the act of meanness itself. You can claim I’m not ‘looking deep enough’ but you are begging the question then and simply appealing to some ‘invisible’ third party to save you. The principle of charity dictates that you have to take people at their word otherwise we cannot even have discussions. My word is that I’ve done this. The simple truth is, I have. Meh.

    As to the free will debate…there is no debate. You are predetermined. Philosophy has largely moved past this as a relevant subject because the overwhelming mountain of evidence lands in favor of causal determinism. Of course this also rules out most spirituality as a side effect which a lot of people don’t like, but there you have it. Free will is kept–in my experience–as a trinket to show 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate students. No one seriously defends this anymore. It’s just ludicrous with science at the level it’s at.

    All in all, this list seems directed at those who you either think know more than you or who tell you they know more than you. There is a distinct bias against the hard-sciences which is slightly disturbing since every modern convenience we have is directely attributable to the hard sciences.

    Anyway, nice list at least in part

    Cheers!

  17. @DemChi

    It’s very interesting how many people have the illusion that how/what they feel is a choice.

    Refuting that illusion can be done from many angles. For example, if feeling is a choice, why is there a drug trade?

    If people can choose how they feel why can’t they simply choose to feel high?

    Cognitive psychology disagrees with you to the n-th degree. So does any modern understanding of how the brain works.

    Since you brought up psychology and brain structure, how come phobics can’t simply choose to not feel irrational fear?

    The words motive and emotion have the same root for a good reason. Emotions predate cognition, on an anatomical and historical level. Indeed the term “neo” in neo cortex means new. Emotions arise primarily in the limbic system, the same area of the brain we share with the very earliest of complex life forms. The other name for this system I might add is “Paleomammalian brain.”

    Even a cursory glance at complex life demonstrates rather strongly that emotions happen To us far more than Because of us.

    Granted the human neo cortex (redundant, for now) is specifically designed to interrupt the circuit allowing for behavior corrections, actions in spite of emotion, that can in turn influence stimulus and therefor emotion. Also meditation can control mental states by diverting resources (blood flow) through over stimulus of given areas of the brain, but for all practical purposes emotion for the vast majority of people in the vast majority of cases is wholly outside our control.

    In my opinion people that cling strongly to this attitude of emotions/feelings being a function of choice typically have an agenda requiring others to suppress theirs, or they themselves are being required to suppress them for whatever reason and avoid actually thinking the matter through to in turn avoid emotional pain.

    In part the conclusion that a person cannot be blamed for how they feel changes the very nature of responsibility, and since our entire social system is based on what we are held responsible for this concept can be extremely painful when you come to realize you’ve been punished and rewarded for things wholly outside your control.

    Ironic, considering that if this group were correct they could simply choose not to be bothered by it.

    You control your thoughts, you control your emotions. Simple.

    One doesn’t control one’s thoughts, they proceed from a complex interaction of memory and stimulus. For example, think of a random number, don’t think of elephants. Did you choose to think of numbers and elephants or did you do so because you read about them just now?

    Emotions can indeed be stimulated by thought, but which emotion is produced by that thought is outside our control. A simple look at opinion makes that crystal clear. For example, when I think of abortion I have a given emotional reaction and opinion. I think it’s very safe to say that there is going to be someone out there who will react emotionally in a completely different way to the exact same thought.

    Of course, this does require you to make a distinction between emotions and feelings.

    Some feelings are emotions but not all emotions are feelings, for example, I feel silk, I feel fear, but fear is an emotion, silk is not. I’m not going to use the word feelings because it is vague and cluttered, if I need to I’ll use the word sensation, tactile, olfactory, etc.

    a very Disney view of things

    Except that the whole point of my list is to empower children, Disney has exactly the opposite purpose. I’m encouraging individualism, Disney is a homogenizing force.

    For instance, I’ve decided to be mean on purpose.

    But you did so because of an emotional reaction or state that was outside your control. Your goal was to feel better, and you acted according to the dictates of your emotion and memory in such a way that you believe would improve your emotional state.

    As to the free will debate…there is no debate. You are predetermined.

    Agreed. But… one wonders how you can believe that reality is unavoidably uniform (As Morpheus put it; “No, what happened happened and couldn’t have happened any other way.”) and still think that emotion is a choice when you’ve just committed to a belief that renders all choice illusory.

    There is a distinct bias against the hard-sciences

    Feel free to defend that. I of course strongly disagree.

  18. @DemChi

    It’s very interesting how many people have the illusion that how/what they feel is a choice.

    Refuting that illusion can be done from many angles. For example, if feeling is a choice, why is there a drug trade?

    If people can choose how they feel why can’t they simply choose to feel high?

    Cognitive psychology disagrees with you to the n-th degree. So does any modern understanding of how the brain works.

    Since you brought up psychology and brain structure, how come phobics can’t simply choose to not feel irrational fear?

    The words motive and emotion have the same root for a good reason. Emotions predate cognition, on an anatomical and historical level. Indeed the term “neo” in neo cortex means new. Emotions arise primarily in the limbic system, the same area of the brain we share with the very earliest of complex life forms. The other name for this system I might add is “Paleomammalian brain.”

    Even a cursory glance at complex life demonstrates rather strongly that emotions happen To us far more than Because of us.

    Granted the human neo cortex (redundant, for now) is specifically designed to interrupt the circuit allowing for behavior corrections, actions in spite of emotion, that can in turn influence stimulus and therefor emotion. Also meditation can control mental states by diverting resources (blood flow) through over stimulus of given areas of the brain, but for all practical purposes emotion for the vast majority of people in the vast majority of cases is wholly outside our control.

    In my opinion people that cling strongly to this attitude of emotions/feelings being a function of choice typically have an agenda requiring others to suppress theirs, or they themselves are being required to suppress them for whatever reason and avoid actually thinking the matter through to in turn avoid emotional pain.

    In part the conclusion that a person cannot be blamed for how they feel changes the very nature of responsibility, and since our entire social system is based on what we are held responsible for this concept can be extremely painful when you come to realize you’ve been punished and rewarded for things wholly outside your control.

    Ironic, considering that if this group were correct they could simply choose not to be bothered by it.

    You control your thoughts, you control your emotions. Simple.

    One doesn’t control one’s thoughts, they proceed from a complex interaction of memory and stimulus. For example, think of a random number, don’t think of elephants. Did you choose to think of numbers and elephants or did you do so because you read about them just now?

    Emotions can indeed be stimulated by thought, but which emotion is produced by that thought is outside our control. A simple look at opinion makes that crystal clear. For example, when I think of abortion I have a given emotional reaction and opinion. I think it’s very safe to say that there is going to be someone out there who will react emotionally in a completely different way to the exact same thought.

    Of course, this does require you to make a distinction between emotions and feelings.

    Some feelings are emotions but not all emotions are feelings, for example, I feel silk, I feel fear, but fear is an emotion, silk is not. I’m not going to use the word feelings because it is vague and cluttered, if I need to I’ll use the word sensation, tactile, olfactory, etc.

    a very Disney view of things

    Except that the whole point of my list is to empower children, Disney has exactly the opposite purpose. I’m encouraging individualism, Disney is a homogenizing force.

    For instance, I’ve decided to be mean on purpose.

    But you did so because of an emotional reaction or state that was outside your control. Your goal was to feel better, and you acted according to the dictates of your emotion and memory in such a way that you believe would improve your emotional state.

    As to the free will debate…there is no debate. You are predetermined.

    Agreed. But… one wonders how you can believe that reality is unavoidably uniform (As Morpheus put it; “No, what happened happened and couldn’t have happened any other way.”) and still think that emotion is a choice when you’ve just committed to a belief that renders all choice illusory.

    There is a distinct bias against the hard-sciences

    Feel free to defend that. I of course strongly disagree.

  19. There is an undercurrent of helplessness in many of these: 11. No one chooses how smart they are.
    12. No one chooses how they feel.

    If a child is to be provided with guidance, he should be empowered. An individual has the ultimate authority over his state of mind and his thoughts. Those thoughts will determine your feelings; you control those feelings.

    There is so much emphasis on external factors beyond our control, where it might be more prudent to emphasize development of internal controls which will serve us through good times and bad.

    Like most lists, there are too many items here. Give people half a dozen as food for thought.

    Many of these were very touching and deserved a clearer platform.

  20. There is an undercurrent of helplessness in many of these: 11. No one chooses how smart they are.
    12. No one chooses how they feel.

    If a child is to be provided with guidance, he should be empowered. An individual has the ultimate authority over his state of mind and his thoughts. Those thoughts will determine your feelings; you control those feelings.

    There is so much emphasis on external factors beyond our control, where it might be more prudent to emphasize development of internal controls which will serve us through good times and bad.

    Like most lists, there are too many items here. Give people half a dozen as food for thought.

    Many of these were very touching and deserved a clearer platform.

  21. @t

    I don’t believe my response to DemChi was posted when you wrote this, so please look it over and let me know what remaining concerns you have on the subject of emotional control.

    If a child is to be provided with guidance, he should be empowered.

    Indeed, a big part of the point of this list is to illustrate for children the difference between guidance and oppression, so that they might fight the one and usefully accept the other.

    There is so much emphasis on external factors beyond our control,

    I didn’t write the laws of physics. Take it up with management :)

    it might be more prudent to emphasize development of internal controls which will serve us through good times and bad.

    Who define prudent in this case? The assumption of society is that children should be made into something predetermined, I wholly disagree. Parenting is increasingly defined as a training program with a goal. People treat children like complicated dogs to be trained or robots to be programmed. Children have no rights as individuals in our society and it sickens me, this list reflects my reaction to that sentiment. I wish to alert them to the situation they are in so they can approach it empowered with accurate knowledge.

    A good parent in my view has no idea what their child will be like. A good parent in society’s view knows exactly what their child will be like and will stop at nothing to produce it, even going so far as to intimidate/coerce them.

    Like most lists, there are too many items here.

    Again, life is complicated, and we subject children to decades of “Education” ostensibly to “help” them. A couple pages of text is a drop in that bucket. This list is the proper size for it’s goal.

    Thank you for your comments.

  22. @t

    I don’t believe my response to DemChi was posted when you wrote this, so please look it over and let me know what remaining concerns you have on the subject of emotional control.

    If a child is to be provided with guidance, he should be empowered.

    Indeed, a big part of the point of this list is to illustrate for children the difference between guidance and oppression, so that they might fight the one and usefully accept the other.

    There is so much emphasis on external factors beyond our control,

    I didn’t write the laws of physics. Take it up with management :)

    it might be more prudent to emphasize development of internal controls which will serve us through good times and bad.

    Who define prudent in this case? The assumption of society is that children should be made into something predetermined, I wholly disagree. Parenting is increasingly defined as a training program with a goal. People treat children like complicated dogs to be trained or robots to be programmed. Children have no rights as individuals in our society and it sickens me, this list reflects my reaction to that sentiment. I wish to alert them to the situation they are in so they can approach it empowered with accurate knowledge.

    A good parent in my view has no idea what their child will be like. A good parent in society’s view knows exactly what their child will be like and will stop at nothing to produce it, even going so far as to intimidate/coerce them.

    Like most lists, there are too many items here.

    Again, life is complicated, and we subject children to decades of “Education” ostensibly to “help” them. A couple pages of text is a drop in that bucket. This list is the proper size for it’s goal.

    Thank you for your comments.

  23. Let’s do a little thought experiment to clear up the emotion thing.

    You point a gun at my head, I emote fear–as opposed to feel fear which I’m claiming is an important distinction.

    Now, you point that same gun at a person who does not know what a gun is. They may emote many things but not necessarily fear. That is because they lack the cognitive structure–the thoughts–to understand it and thus emote anything.

    This is why I make the distinction between emotions and feelings. Feelings are automatic, you can’t choose to not feel cold. Emotions are cognitive.

    As to the free will thing; just because things are causally determined does not mean we are going to go about our lives any differently than before–as if we could! My point with philosophy leaving that subject alone is that they realized it’s one of those topics that it does you no good to pursue, you don’t/can’t change anything in your life based on it. Meh, so what?

  24. Let’s do a little thought experiment to clear up the emotion thing.

    You point a gun at my head, I emote fear–as opposed to feel fear which I’m claiming is an important distinction.

    Now, you point that same gun at a person who does not know what a gun is. They may emote many things but not necessarily fear. That is because they lack the cognitive structure–the thoughts–to understand it and thus emote anything.

    This is why I make the distinction between emotions and feelings. Feelings are automatic, you can’t choose to not feel cold. Emotions are cognitive.

    As to the free will thing; just because things are causally determined does not mean we are going to go about our lives any differently than before–as if we could! My point with philosophy leaving that subject alone is that they realized it’s one of those topics that it does you no good to pursue, you don’t/can’t change anything in your life based on it. Meh, so what?

  25. Cute, but generally horseshit. Maybe this will help people feel better about their failings in life, but it will not make them a better or stronger person.

  26. Cute, but generally horseshit. Maybe this will help people feel better about their failings in life, but it will not make them a better or stronger person.

  27. @DemChi

    You’re needlessly complicating a simple example to create an illusory distinction.

    “Feeling” is just a vagary of semantics. It is about as exact as “thingy.” The relevant terms are sensation and emotion.

    The reaction difference between the parties in your thought experiment is easily explained by your manipulation of their memory. It tells us nothing about the nature of emotion. And you know it.

    What your fearless subject lacks is the memory of what a gun suggests, thus the character of the stimulus is changed. You might as well have pointed a banana at one of them for all the similarity between the subjects and experimental value presented.

    And just because you’ve abandoned thinking about free will doesn’t mean others have. If you think philosophy as a study is done with free will you’re simply not paying attention. Are you a PHD in philosophy? I ask not because a PHD means anything but because a PHD is likely to be well versed on the state of academic philosophical discussion.

    I can’t say for certain of course, but lucky for me, you’re the one that made the claim, and you’re now in a place where you have to prove a negative. Good luck.

  28. @DemChi

    You’re needlessly complicating a simple example to create an illusory distinction.

    “Feeling” is just a vagary of semantics. It is about as exact as “thingy.” The relevant terms are sensation and emotion.

    The reaction difference between the parties in your thought experiment is easily explained by your manipulation of their memory. It tells us nothing about the nature of emotion. And you know it.

    What your fearless subject lacks is the memory of what a gun suggests, thus the character of the stimulus is changed. You might as well have pointed a banana at one of them for all the similarity between the subjects and experimental value presented.

    And just because you’ve abandoned thinking about free will doesn’t mean others have. If you think philosophy as a study is done with free will you’re simply not paying attention. Are you a PHD in philosophy? I ask not because a PHD means anything but because a PHD is likely to be well versed on the state of academic philosophical discussion.

    I can’t say for certain of course, but lucky for me, you’re the one that made the claim, and you’re now in a place where you have to prove a negative. Good luck.

  29. @dwindle

    I see, so its preferable to make children suffering emotional cripples wracked with guilt about things utterly beyond their control so that their betters can continue to live in comfort off the fruits of their labor justified only by accident of birth.

    Your definition of strength isn’t even yours. You’re product. Congratulations.

    Perhaps it escaped your notice, since you obviously were raised to be a slave just like mommy and daddy, but children are human beings with rights. They are not sides of beef awaiting a USDA stamp.

    If your goal for children is to produce the next wave of cheap and pliant labor, then yes of course this list will fail to make them “better” read as “more productive” or “stronger” read as “silently obedient.”

    If however your goal is to aid in the formation of emotionally healthy, ethically responsible, creative, compassionate, problem solving individuals, ready to enrich the lives of everyone around them including themselves, then perhaps you should take another look at it.

    Why don’t you go flog yourself and write a hymn to plutocracy if that’s what you think strength and betterment means?

    On a personal note, you antler bashing tools disgust me and you should be thankful people of my capability were given ethics and compassion, because had we not, those antlers would be adorning someone’s secret trophy case.

    You’re lucky that not everyone subscribes to your mindless competitive Horatio Alger mythology. Very lucky.

    How about you demonstrate the smallest amount of cognitive ability and choose a particular item you disagree with, present a semi cogent, somewhat rational expression of that disagreement and I’ll reply.

    Perhaps I can disabuse you of your illusions and you’ll be happier and kinder as a result, rather than a chest thumping minion of orthodoxy. :)

  30. @dwindle

    I see, so its preferable to make children suffering emotional cripples wracked with guilt about things utterly beyond their control so that their betters can continue to live in comfort off the fruits of their labor justified only by accident of birth.

    Your definition of strength isn’t even yours. You’re product. Congratulations.

    Perhaps it escaped your notice, since you obviously were raised to be a slave just like mommy and daddy, but children are human beings with rights. They are not sides of beef awaiting a USDA stamp.

    If your goal for children is to produce the next wave of cheap and pliant labor, then yes of course this list will fail to make them “better” read as “more productive” or “stronger” read as “silently obedient.”

    If however your goal is to aid in the formation of emotionally healthy, ethically responsible, creative, compassionate, problem solving individuals, ready to enrich the lives of everyone around them including themselves, then perhaps you should take another look at it.

    Why don’t you go flog yourself and write a hymn to plutocracy if that’s what you think strength and betterment means?

    On a personal note, you antler bashing tools disgust me and you should be thankful people of my capability were given ethics and compassion, because had we not, those antlers would be adorning someone’s secret trophy case.

    You’re lucky that not everyone subscribes to your mindless competitive Horatio Alger mythology. Very lucky.

    How about you demonstrate the smallest amount of cognitive ability and choose a particular item you disagree with, present a semi cogent, somewhat rational expression of that disagreement and I’ll reply.

    Perhaps I can disabuse you of your illusions and you’ll be happier and kinder as a result, rather than a chest thumping minion of orthodoxy. :)

  31. I dont know what i like more, the list or the responses 😀

    Most of the points on this list were nothing new for my brain, as i consider myself lucky that i didnt have parents that had some special plans for me. Teachers, TV and Society are a different story… Life is just an exercise, but dont ask me in what. I have no fucking clue!

    Somethings about myself (english is not my native language)
    When i was a youngster, i was that guy that tried to !force! others to see life in many different perspectives (no exceptions). Later in life i understood how exhausting i was with my raging thoughts and my constant changing person. Impossible to grasb. And i also learned to respect the ignorance of others. But I sometimes wonder how much impact i had on my fellow men and somehow I think that my actions-thoughts had the opposite effect then what my intentions were. I was a mirror that reflected the unknown. Exactly what most people fear the most. All the little things they dont understand in others. Not that i felt responsible for others, it’s their thing how they dealt with me and i almost never was angry when i was rejected. It was more like a sadness, especially when they dont even tried to understand or playing dump on purpose. For me, being misunderstood was how it supposed to be. Sometimes i wonder how certain people would be like, if we never had a relationship with each another. I hate it when i meet some old “friends”, that they almost automatically see me as the person i was then (really just a memory). For me its always as if i meet a new person. They want to see what changed since then and what my plans are for the future. I want to get to know who they are now..
    Way to many people run out of time to get to know themselves. Your life between fourteen and twenty is for you to understand WHAT your are, not WHO you want to be. AWW forget the last two sentences and the advice in it. I just want you to ask: Did you ever meet a person like me? And if so, how did he make you “feel” and what do you think of that person now?

    The biggest challenge in life is to be that new person that you really are every single day. Not that guy from yesterday.

    @Innomen, I like your honest straightforwardness. Now that is what i call a clear thought process!

    Kudos to you!

  32. I dont know what i like more, the list or the responses 😀

    Most of the points on this list were nothing new for my brain, as i consider myself lucky that i didnt have parents that had some special plans for me. Teachers, TV and Society are a different story… Life is just an exercise, but dont ask me in what. I have no fucking clue!

    Somethings about myself (english is not my native language)
    When i was a youngster, i was that guy that tried to !force! others to see life in many different perspectives (no exceptions). Later in life i understood how exhausting i was with my raging thoughts and my constant changing person. Impossible to grasb. And i also learned to respect the ignorance of others. But I sometimes wonder how much impact i had on my fellow men and somehow I think that my actions-thoughts had the opposite effect then what my intentions were. I was a mirror that reflected the unknown. Exactly what most people fear the most. All the little things they dont understand in others. Not that i felt responsible for others, it’s their thing how they dealt with me and i almost never was angry when i was rejected. It was more like a sadness, especially when they dont even tried to understand or playing dump on purpose. For me, being misunderstood was how it supposed to be. Sometimes i wonder how certain people would be like, if we never had a relationship with each another. I hate it when i meet some old “friends”, that they almost automatically see me as the person i was then (really just a memory). For me its always as if i meet a new person. They want to see what changed since then and what my plans are for the future. I want to get to know who they are now..
    Way to many people run out of time to get to know themselves. Your life between fourteen and twenty is for you to understand WHAT your are, not WHO you want to be. AWW forget the last two sentences and the advice in it. I just want you to ask: Did you ever meet a person like me? And if so, how did he make you “feel” and what do you think of that person now?

    The biggest challenge in life is to be that new person that you really are every single day. Not that guy from yesterday.

    @Innomen, I like your honest straightforwardness. Now that is what i call a clear thought process!

    Kudos to you!

  33. Thank you for the compliment and the serious response. To answer your question of if I’ve met a person like you the answer is I don’t know and wouldn’t remember if I did. The price of seeing things from the large scale abstract is the tendency to marginalize the importance of the personal.

    But I’m certain the shape of the organism I am now depended heavily on contact with people who serve the purpose you desire to serve at key points during the formation of my ideology.

    The thing we most seem to share is a desire to transcend the singular perspective from which we all find escape ultimately impossible. However, there are work arounds, and it seems we’ve both embraced one or two of them, ironically for self serving reasons, since those reasons are the only honest ones.

    Again, thank you for your comment. It’s nice to hear something nice for a change.

  34. Thank you for the compliment and the serious response. To answer your question of if I’ve met a person like you the answer is I don’t know and wouldn’t remember if I did. The price of seeing things from the large scale abstract is the tendency to marginalize the importance of the personal.

    But I’m certain the shape of the organism I am now depended heavily on contact with people who serve the purpose you desire to serve at key points during the formation of my ideology.

    The thing we most seem to share is a desire to transcend the singular perspective from which we all find escape ultimately impossible. However, there are work arounds, and it seems we’ve both embraced one or two of them, ironically for self serving reasons, since those reasons are the only honest ones.

    Again, thank you for your comment. It’s nice to hear something nice for a change.

  35. “The price of … the importance of the personal.” So true…

    btw. my question was a rethorical one. Just so that everybody can answer it to themselves.

    thx, you were a reminder of something very important

    cheerio

  36. “The price of … the importance of the personal.” So true…

    btw. my question was a rethorical one. Just so that everybody can answer it to themselves.

    thx, you were a reminder of something very important

    cheerio

  37. This list is legit for sure…although i know plenty of adults that need to read this as well.

    Interesting side note about DemChi’s debate over cold and guns. I remember reading about feral children (i think that’s what they’re called) in psych and it mentioned that they didnt understand the concept of cold (or guns for that matter).

  38. This list is legit for sure…although i know plenty of adults that need to read this as well.

    Interesting side note about DemChi’s debate over cold and guns. I remember reading about feral children (i think that’s what they’re called) in psych and it mentioned that they didnt understand the concept of cold (or guns for that matter).

  39. Hah… I stumbled upon this article by chance, and I’m quite happy I did.

    “Not all things are scalable.” Heh. It’s a concept I still struggle with, but it’s one I’ve found over my few short years to be true. You’ve done a much better job here collectively than I ever could have, but I’m forced to ask the question, how many items on this list can be scaled in themselves? I guess as far as intent goes, each item is restrained inherently… but the suggestion of the list itself speaks to something higher than the guidance of a child’s mind. That, or I really am still a child. Haha. Or, perhaps, our children are just that important? I guess any option is refreshing in its own way.

    Rarely do you see a list of any focus or scope so well-constructed and purposed; to you, I must lay my knuckles on bare stone. Whether it’s a product of predetermined function or wit (whether you made the list intentionally to support itself or you’re just really good at defending the individual parts), the execution is flawless, if not aesthetic. And as an observer, your thoughts provide a high concentration of viable, well-defended insight. Luckily, there were some responses, giving you a conduit to express the details of your more divisive points, which I believe arbitrarily suggests accountability. “If people are talking about it, it’s obviously worth talking about.”

    I’m a proponent of the human condition. The interaction between sensation and emotion is as old as our species, and in recent years, we’ve approached a relative scientific certainty that every emotion we can conceive is grown exclusively from a specific soil of sensation and circumstance. Being a proponent as such, I am instinctually compelled to refute the idea that humans cannot decide how they feel or think. This may a bit of straw man, but I have always felt that understanding breeds manipulation, and in that way, a body who understands his or her sensations and experiences is instinctually driven to control them… That’s what I think, anyway. Rarely do I get the opportunity to safely manipulate my sensations and experiences to produce measurable results, but I know that if I were to fully understand what my mind was doing while feeling fear or love or anger, I’d seek to recreate or suppress those specific feelings. The overall emotional picture is complex, so only by thorough, calculated manipulation would I be able to yield a defendable conclusion, but… in concept, at least, I find the adage to be true.

    Strangely, I’ve always been one of those people who doesn’t understand why phobics (as you mentioned earlier) are irrationally afraid of certain things. It seems so simple to me, the cognitive distinction between stimulus and sensation (input) and emotional reaction (output)… I find it very difficult to believe a person, reacting phobically to the space of a cramped, warm elevator, actually finds the extra two degrees frightening, or really believes that the man in the tweed suit will suffocate him if he steps an inch closer. The irrationality of it seems so clear to me, but there is obviously something else at work. These individuals just seem to be closer to this condition than to logic, in those specific situations. Though I claim to understand how it works (logically and emotionally), my mind is just as alien to me as it is to a doctor with a degree. One specific item you detailed in your list really sits at home with me, in all my cognitive walks and explorations. I’ve always quoted its wisdom in a different way, but the concept, I believe, is the same. “There is no truth; only perspective.” “13. Almost everything is a matter of opinion.” Though my rendition is more black-and-white, rarely do I hold it to its absolute. What yours may lack in aesthetic, it makes up for in global acceptability.

    I must return to my duties; these jaunts always throw me off my work schedule, but I just feel so compelled to respond.

  40. Hah… I stumbled upon this article by chance, and I’m quite happy I did.

    “Not all things are scalable.” Heh. It’s a concept I still struggle with, but it’s one I’ve found over my few short years to be true. You’ve done a much better job here collectively than I ever could have, but I’m forced to ask the question, how many items on this list can be scaled in themselves? I guess as far as intent goes, each item is restrained inherently… but the suggestion of the list itself speaks to something higher than the guidance of a child’s mind. That, or I really am still a child. Haha. Or, perhaps, our children are just that important? I guess any option is refreshing in its own way.

    Rarely do you see a list of any focus or scope so well-constructed and purposed; to you, I must lay my knuckles on bare stone. Whether it’s a product of predetermined function or wit (whether you made the list intentionally to support itself or you’re just really good at defending the individual parts), the execution is flawless, if not aesthetic. And as an observer, your thoughts provide a high concentration of viable, well-defended insight. Luckily, there were some responses, giving you a conduit to express the details of your more divisive points, which I believe arbitrarily suggests accountability. “If people are talking about it, it’s obviously worth talking about.”

    I’m a proponent of the human condition. The interaction between sensation and emotion is as old as our species, and in recent years, we’ve approached a relative scientific certainty that every emotion we can conceive is grown exclusively from a specific soil of sensation and circumstance. Being a proponent as such, I am instinctually compelled to refute the idea that humans cannot decide how they feel or think. This may a bit of straw man, but I have always felt that understanding breeds manipulation, and in that way, a body who understands his or her sensations and experiences is instinctually driven to control them… That’s what I think, anyway. Rarely do I get the opportunity to safely manipulate my sensations and experiences to produce measurable results, but I know that if I were to fully understand what my mind was doing while feeling fear or love or anger, I’d seek to recreate or suppress those specific feelings. The overall emotional picture is complex, so only by thorough, calculated manipulation would I be able to yield a defendable conclusion, but… in concept, at least, I find the adage to be true.

    Strangely, I’ve always been one of those people who doesn’t understand why phobics (as you mentioned earlier) are irrationally afraid of certain things. It seems so simple to me, the cognitive distinction between stimulus and sensation (input) and emotional reaction (output)… I find it very difficult to believe a person, reacting phobically to the space of a cramped, warm elevator, actually finds the extra two degrees frightening, or really believes that the man in the tweed suit will suffocate him if he steps an inch closer. The irrationality of it seems so clear to me, but there is obviously something else at work. These individuals just seem to be closer to this condition than to logic, in those specific situations. Though I claim to understand how it works (logically and emotionally), my mind is just as alien to me as it is to a doctor with a degree. One specific item you detailed in your list really sits at home with me, in all my cognitive walks and explorations. I’ve always quoted its wisdom in a different way, but the concept, I believe, is the same. “There is no truth; only perspective.” “13. Almost everything is a matter of opinion.” Though my rendition is more black-and-white, rarely do I hold it to its absolute. What yours may lack in aesthetic, it makes up for in global acceptability.

    I must return to my duties; these jaunts always throw me off my work schedule, but I just feel so compelled to respond.

  41. I am very reassured by this list. The fact that people are willing to try to make us kids feel better is very refreshing. One other thing that could have been added to this list is that grades don’t matter. Learning does.

  42. I am very reassured by this list. The fact that people are willing to try to make us kids feel better is very refreshing. One other thing that could have been added to this list is that grades don’t matter. Learning does.

  43. @Innomen

    People can learn to control their emotions. Just look at Buddhist monks. Meditation is a very powerful tool to achieve emotional stability.

  44. @Innomen

    People can learn to control their emotions. Just look at Buddhist monks. Meditation is a very powerful tool to achieve emotional stability.

  45. #1 and #12 are clearly horseshit. That sort of thinking leads to victimization. If you are observant of your emotions they become easy to control. :)

    If I’m not responsible for my emotions, then who is?

  46. #1 and #12 are clearly horseshit. That sort of thinking leads to victimization. If you are observant of your emotions they become easy to control. :)

    If I’m not responsible for my emotions, then who is?

  47. #12 is probably the most emotionally destructive piece of advice I can think of.

    If I’m not responsible for how I feel, then who is? My boss? My parents? My girlfriend? What a ridiculous way to live. You can either control your emotions, or you can let them control you.

    Agreed at free will being a joke.

  48. #12 is probably the most emotionally destructive piece of advice I can think of.

    If I’m not responsible for how I feel, then who is? My boss? My parents? My girlfriend? What a ridiculous way to live. You can either control your emotions, or you can let them control you.

    Agreed at free will being a joke.

  49. this shouldnt only be for kids most adults I kno could use to hear this

  50. this shouldnt only be for kids most adults I kno could use to hear this

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